Ivan E. Coyote Joan Nestle Zena Sharman Amber Dawn S. Bear Bergman Sinclair Sexsmith Anna Camilleri Debra Anderson
Persistence: All Ways Butch and Femme
April 20, 2018 Comments.. 968
Persistence All Ways Butch and Femme Lambda Literary Award finalistAmerican Library Association Stonewall Honor BookIn the summer of butch writer and storyteller Ivan Coyote and gender researcher and femme dynamo Zena Sharman wrote

  • Title: Persistence: All Ways Butch and Femme
  • Author: Ivan E. Coyote Joan Nestle Zena Sharman Amber Dawn S. Bear Bergman Sinclair Sexsmith Anna Camilleri Debra Anderson
  • ISBN: 9781551523972
  • Page: 145
  • Format: Paperback
  • Lambda Literary Award finalistAmerican Library Association Stonewall Honor BookIn the summer of 2009, butch writer and storyteller Ivan Coyote and gender researcher and femme dynamo Zena Sharman wrote down a wish list of their favourite queer authors they wanted to continue and expand the butch femme conversation The result is Persistence All Ways Butch and Femme The sLambda Literary Award finalistAmerican Library Association Stonewall Honor BookIn the summer of 2009, butch writer and storyteller Ivan Coyote and gender researcher and femme dynamo Zena Sharman wrote down a wish list of their favourite queer authors they wanted to continue and expand the butch femme conversation The result is Persistence All Ways Butch and Femme The stories in these pages resist simple definitions The people in these stories defy reductive stereotypes and inflexible categories The pages in this book describe the lives of an incredible diversity of people whose hearts also pounded for some reason the first time they read or heard the words butch or femme Contributors such as Jewelle Gomez The Gilda Stories , Thea Hillman Intersex , S Bear Bergman Butch is a Noun , Chandra Mayor All the Pretty Girls , Amber Dawn Sub Rosa , Anna Camilleri Brazen Femme , Debra Anderson Code White , Anne Fleming Anomaly , Michael V Smith Cumberland , and Zoe Whittall Bottle Rocket Hearts explore the parameters, history, and power of a multitude of butch and femme realities It s a raucous, insightful, sexy, and sometimes dangerous look at what the words butch and femme can mean in today s ever shifting gender landscape, with one eye on the past and the other on what is to come.Includes a foreword by Joan Nestle, renowned femme author and editor of The Persistent Desire A Femme Butch Reader, a landmark anthology originally published in 1992.Ivan E Coyote is the author of seven books including the novel Bow Grip, an American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book and a long time muser on the trappings of the two party gender system.Zena Sharman is the assistant director of Canada s national Institute of Gender and Health.

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      Published :2018-04-20T21:06:14+00:00

    1 Blog on “Persistence: All Ways Butch and Femme

    1. Elizabeth says:

      I would say about 25% of the essays I really liked, 50% were forgettable, and 25% made me extremely uncomfortable. Things that I loved: reading about different kinds of gender expression and gendered desire. Things I didn't like: oppression Olympics, the who's-more-radical-than-who competition, anyone complaining about "butch flight" or resenting transgender or genderqueer people for abandoning "real butches." Some essays were wonderful.

    2. Jan magdalene says:

      I don’t mean to be completely negative. there are a couple of good contributions. there are a couple trans woman. it isn’t all white people. but mostly it’s boring and repetitive and not very insightful observations about gender. it dwells mainly on fond FA-lesbian memories of love and gender feels, some half-assed mostly-butch attempts at being all ‘it’s ok to be femme: it’s honourable or something’ there’s the writer who quotes obama and insinuates that trans women are inherent [...]

    3. J. says:

      This is an anthology of writings on femme, butch, and more. It looks at how these identities have evolved and what they mean to individuals. With an excellent forward by Joan Nestle and two fantastic editors--Zena Sharman and Ivan E Coyote--I was very excited for this anthology. As a young person in Vancouver, Coyote's novels represented an universe I dreamed of accessing. I remembered the euphoria at seeing how my high school librarians loved them. However, it took me this long to finally pick [...]

    4. Rachel says:

      There were a small handful of essays that I really loved and more that actually made me pretty uncomfortable or angry, like the ones that argued that cis women femmes are "straight-passing" or that butches and femme men are the only people transgressing gender.

    5. Journey says:

      with something so heavily theorized, it's nice to get personal narratives; but then, personal narratives can also be just as grating, self-indulgent, and/or obnoxious as theory sometimes. I liked a handful of these essays: Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a wonderful, powerful, smart writer; Victoria Brownworth's commentary on how lesbian identities in the mainstream are being so straightwashed, and the forcing of lesbians to be viewed as sexually available to men, is extremely important; I a [...]

    6. Kat Heatherington says:

      brilliant anthology. this collection of personal stories is thoughtful, relevant, insightful and frequently powerful. anyone interested in gender studies will find a goldmine of valuable material in this book. my one criticism is the same criticism i have for most gender studies books: where the heck are the bisexuals? in only a small selection of these essays is bisexuality mentioned or addressed. i valued those essays that much more for including us. on the whole, however, this book is incredi [...]

    7. Jaysen says:

      Actual rating: 2.5-2.7, maybeI always like to think about what audience the author had in mind when I’m reading something, whether it be a short story, essay, or full-length novel. While reading this, I struggled with that question.I identify as a non-binary gay person, “queer” when I’m feeling extra radical, and I identified with a couple of the stories in this, especially the first few (shoutout to “Home/Sickness: Self-Diagnosis” by romham padraig gallacher!) . But as I kept readin [...]

    8. Jean Roberta says:

      This thick collection of essays and manifestoes, with some poems, short fiction and brief autobiographies mixed in, is a current report on the diversity of queer gender identities in the twenty-first century. Its title is similar to that of an earlier book, The Persistent Desire: A Femme-Butch Reader, originally published in 1992. Joan Nestle, a legendary femme writer who remembers the early Gay Rights movement, edited the first anthology. As she says in the foreword to the current book:"When Iv [...]

    9. Margaret Adams says:

      Picked up a copy of this at my friend Dave’s house in Santa Barbara – never met the roommate who it belonged to. A mix of stories, analysis, & stories-as-analysis, some very good, some much less so. The personal is political, etc.

    10. Red says:

      Super hit or miss. Some gross gender politics (TERFy things, bizarrely essentialist things), some crappy, meandering writing. Also, and this is the strangest part for me personally, I'm in the book - as a character referred to as "S" in someone's essay about their gender development. Very strange to see a conversation I remember described and interpreted by the other person, on the page. Also makes me feel famous 💃

    11. Eliot Fiend says:

      loved it. a few words of my greatest appreciation: thanks for helping me learn the names of my ancestors and remember to remember them. our butch and femme and genderfucked, trans, genderqueer, in-between stories are all too easily silenced and whitewashed over even over a decade, a generation. books like this are important for young queers to read (and without having read it yet, "persistent desire" is now definitely on my reading list for the same reason.)this book broadened my understanding o [...]

    12. C.E. G says:

      3.5 stars. Some of the essays here were fantastic, but mostly I felt like they were written for a different crowd. As you can guess from the title, the essays here talk about butch and femme - being one or both or bouncing between the two. But there wasn't much about being neither, which is something I've been aching to read about. Not the fault of the book, but an explanation for why it wasn't a personal 5-star read.Still, a lot of good writing, and I appreciated the diversity of voices, even i [...]

    13. For Books' Sake says:

      "At times simplistic, at times sentimental, at times uncomfortable and alienating, despite its flaws overall Persistence makes for fascinating reading. With a contributors’ list featuring authors, performers, artists and activists, there’s a diverse range of identities and experiences represented, from butch pregnancy to femme invisibility to sex work and all sorts that’s inbetween."(Excerpt from review of Persistence: All Ways Butch & Femme at For Books' Sake)

    14. CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian says:

      Edited by the impressive team of Ivan E. Coyote and Zena Sharman—an adorable married couple (see photo below)—the collection Persistence: All Ways Butch and Femme (2011) certainly does live up to its name. It’s refreshing to see an anthology reflect a remarkable diversity of perspectives on these two loaded concepts and identities. It’s exactly what you’d expect from the Vancouver-based Ivan—a storyteller and writer—and Zena—a radical government bureaucrat and gender researcher, [...]

    15. Victoria says:

      I really liked to read a book that validated femme identity as more than just a choice to wear fabulous clothing. I also appreciated that most of the essays were personal stories as opposed to academic takes on gender theory. The anthology had a number of different voices that took part to create a more textured vision of the butch-femme dynamic. I do appreciate the effort, though it had its flaws.

    16. Katie Mcintyre says:

      Some of these were powerful and beautiful and great, and some of these just seemed to valorise (cis women) butch and femme identities at the expense of androgyny, trans* and other queer identities, which was just effing punishing, tbh. There really was a broad spectrum of essays and pieces, though, and many that I really enjoyed reading.

    17. Emma Pettersson says:

      2.5

    18. Sean Estelle says:

      What a fantastic collection. Over under and through all sorts of gender complexities. HIGHLY RECOMMEND.

    19. Théo says:

      I'm rating this a 4 because overall the texts were pretty good. The author all have very different experiences and visions on the femme/butch thing and that was pretty great, some compilations like these can be a bit repetitive because they feature people who all think the same way, so that was refreshing, even though some texts included were a bit cringe-inducing. For instance some of the texts implied that all trans guys were/are butch which is clearly false and I just can't believe we're not [...]

    20. Aryeh says:

      Truth: I didn't particularly like all the writings in this book, but I needed to read them. It might sound odd, but I'm a faggy butchy leather person who has really no patience for and barely any interest in literature that falls into queer or women's studies genre. I've read this book off and on, bits and pieces here and there for months and months. Some stories were fantasies (or retelling of facts?) and there was a poem or two that really got me going, but in general the bits that moved towar [...]

    21. Heather says:

      I haven't read the (now out-of-print) The Persistent Desire: A Femme-Butch Reader that the title of this anthology is a nod to. I'm still trying to track down a copy at the Free Library. So I can't really comment on whether the two books are trying to accomplish the same goal, or if Persistence is more up-to-date and relevant, as some reviews have implied.I was surprised how pleased I was with this book, since there's always the risk of anthologies feeling stale halfway through like half of the [...]

    22. Javier says:

      Thus far I'm shocked at how self-indulgent Joan Nestle's introduction is, from name-dropping to an outright "you'd better thank me for what I've done for you" kind of attitude. A better editor could have shaped it into something constructive, no? The rest of the book has been hit or miss so far. Unfortunate, because I'd read Ivan E. Coyote's midnight napkin scribbles, were they proffered to me! Will report back upon completion. So far the most standout have been Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha' [...]

    23. Levi Amichai says:

      Sooooo damnnnnnn gooooood! Very grateful to have picked this up at the library tent at Pride, otherwise it would have languished on my to-read list for a lot longer.As with any book of essays, some are better than others. A few random favorites (and these are mindblowingly good!): Amy Fox, Amber Dawn, Chandra Mayor. Jeanne Cordova's was probably the most disappointing and frustrating: for some reason, she thought it would be a good idea to make a linear scale on which to organize all the gender [...]

    24. Zoom says:

      I found this anthology of essays and stories about gender identity and sexuality enlightening. Even when you narrow the range of gender possibilities down to just butch and femme, the perspectives are still so diverse and complex. (I'm still trying to wrap my head around Michael V. Smith's male-to-male transition.) (Side note: back in the 70s when I was a radical young feminist, there was no space in the movement for people with penises.)The collection is credible without being academic. It's ve [...]

    25. Adina says:

      I picked this up because I unabashedly love Ivan's work and thought I would learn a lot from it. I did. Some of the essays are beautiful and moving, but over half way through the book I had to put it down.Everyone is entitled to their own self definition, but the labels and definitions feel limiting and prescriptive. To be fair, I should have expected that from the concept of the book. Maybe I'll pick this up again in a few years and read through the essays that speak to me.

    26. Sarah says:

      As with all anthologies, something of a mixed bag- some essays that were really awesome, some that really spoke to me, and some that didn't. It was definitely an engaging read, and a book I'm glad that I found.I'll leave this review with my favorite line from the collection: "What is so clear to others escapes us until someone taps us on the shoulder and calls us by our hidden name." -From "A Failed Man", by Michael V. Smith- one of the last essays in the book.

    27. duck reads says:

      To be honest I felt like I'd read a lot of this already, and I think I'm far more in the mood for narrative at the moment than for the kinds of discussions dominating this book. I did like a few of the pieces a lot, though, especially the descriptive and as I said narrative pieces. Made me think of the representations of butch and femme identities I'd like to see in more media. Also, Ivan Coyote is hot in print.

    28. Cole says:

      like most anthologies its a mixed bag. there were a couple essays that i really didn't like and quickly decided to simply skip and then there were several that i adored. some of the themes may feel very familiar if you've already read a bit in this field, but personally i don't mind. in my opinion it was a good introduction to butch and femme identities, as well as a great handful of writers.

    29. Vicky says:

      Abandoned b/c I have to return this to the library, and it became hard to read butch and femme stories one after another in an anthology. I really enjoyed the first piece, "Ride", a lot + the one near the end where a butch kisses a femme in the dark cold crisp countryside.

    30. Caitlin says:

      This book is a butch/femme reader for a new generation. No stereotypes, no expectations, just real people writing about their real experiences of what butch and femme mean to them. This should be required reading for young queers — but older folks will find plenty to ponder as well.

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