Migrants for Export: How the Philippine State Brokers Labor to the World

Migrants for Export How the Philippine State Brokers Labor to the World Migrant workers from the Philippines are ubiquitous to global capitalism with nearly percent of the population employed in almost two hundred countries In a visit to the United States in Phi

  • Title: Migrants for Export: How the Philippine State Brokers Labor to the World
  • Author: Robyn Magalit Rodriguez
  • ISBN: 9780816665273
  • Page: 133
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Migrants for Export: How the Philippine State Brokers Labor to the World

    Migrant workers from the Philippines are ubiquitous to global capitalism, with nearly 10 percent of the population employed in almost two hundred countries In a visit to the United States in 2003, Philippine president Gloria Macapagal Arroyo even referred to herself as not only the head of state but also the CEO of a global Philippine enterprise of eight million FilipinoMigrant workers from the Philippines are ubiquitous to global capitalism, with nearly 10 percent of the population employed in almost two hundred countries In a visit to the United States in 2003, Philippine president Gloria Macapagal Arroyo even referred to herself as not only the head of state but also the CEO of a global Philippine enterprise of eight million Filipinos who live and work abroad Robyn Magalit Rodriguez investigates how and why the Philippine government transformed itself into what she calls a labor brokerage state, which actively prepares, mobilizes, and regulates its citizens for migrant work abroad Filipino men and women fill a range of jobs around the globe, including domestic work, construction, and engineering, and they have even worked in the Middle East to support U.S military operations At the same time, the state redefines nationalism to normalize its citizens to migration while fostering their ties to the Philippines Those who leave the country to work and send their wages to their families at home are treated as new national heroes Drawing on ethnographic research of the Philippine government s migration bureaucracy, interviews, and archival work, Rodriguez presents a new analysis of neoliberal globalization and its consequences for nation state formation.

    Migrant This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Migrant If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Internal migration Internal migration is human migration within one geopolitical entity, usually a nation state Internal migration tends to be travel for education and for economic improvement or because of a natural disaster or civil disturbance. Guatemala Economic Migrants Replace Political Refugees Guatemala s long civil war, which spurred large flows of refugees, has given way to high levels of economic migration to the United States and an economy dependent on remittances Also, Guatemala s geography has made it a prime transit country for migrants headed north, as James Smith of Inforpress Centroamericana reports. Export Control State th International Export Control Conference The Governments of the United States of America and the United Arab Emirates co sponsored the th International Export Control Conference, entitled Strategic Trade Controls From Foundations to Practice in Dubai, March , . Migrant Engineers Migration Skills Assessment Move to Engineers Australia is the designated authority for assessing skills and competencies related to engineering occupations in Australia We work with the Department of Home Affairs, migration agents and international organisations to develop streamlined migration skills assessment procedures for engineers. Every year, we help thousands of engineers in and outside of Australia achieve their goals. The Stories of Migrants Risking Everything for time There are now million international migrants in the world, a reality of our increasingly globalized society that can t be ignored. Slavery v Peonage Slavery By Another Name Bento PBS Slavery v Peonage Peonage, also called debt slavery or debt servitude, is a system where an employer compels a worker to pay off a debt with work. US should work with Mexico in Central America Marshall Plan Dec , U.S should welcome Mexico s bold new steps to help migrants and Central America Mexico is offering visas and jobs to migrants, and investing longterm in a livable Central America. Medicine export declaration form Australian Medicine export declaration This declaration must accompany the medicines being taken or sent out of Australia. Migration Skills Assessment Migrant Engineer Engineers A concise step by step guide to get your Migration Skills Assessment started quickly and easily.

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    One thought on “Migrants for Export: How the Philippine State Brokers Labor to the World

    1. Jo

      I was really glad I read this book. It is quite academic in style, it reads a bit like a PhD thesis, but I think that is how it started. Because of my current context living in Singapore, the whole thing was really interesting for me, I couldn't put the book down. It filled in a shameful gap in my awareness - I had no idea how ignorant I was! I thought people from the Philippines migrated for work overseas as a personal initiative, arising from poverty and desperate prospects in their own countr [...]

    2. Karla

      A dry, straightforward read about the Philippines as a labor brokerage nation. An important book, but I wanted to hear more from the workers' perspective. This is an ethnography of the state, so there's no room for that, but a complementary volume of the workers' voices would be fantastic.

    3. Connie Chuang

      I read this for an Asian American Studies course. I found it both educational and compelling. Our class discussed how it would be better if the author included the worker's voices and stories and I couldn't agree more.

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