Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist

Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist In Alexander Berkman Russian migr anarchist and lover of Emma Goldman attempted to assassinate industrialist Henry Clay Frick The act was intended both as retribution for the massacre of wo

  • Title: Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist
  • Author: Alexander Berkman John William Ward
  • ISBN: 9780940322349
  • Page: 497
  • Format: Paperback
  • Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist

    In 1892, Alexander Berkman, Russian migr , anarchist, and lover of Emma Goldman, attempted to assassinate industrialist Henry Clay Frick The act was intended both as retribution for the massacre of workers in the Homestead strike and as an incitement to revolution Captured and sentenced to serve a prison term of twenty two years, Berkman struggled to make sense of the sIn 1892, Alexander Berkman, Russian migr , anarchist, and lover of Emma Goldman, attempted to assassinate industrialist Henry Clay Frick The act was intended both as retribution for the massacre of workers in the Homestead strike and as an incitement to revolution Captured and sentenced to serve a prison term of twenty two years, Berkman struggled to make sense of the shadowy and brutalized world of the prison one that hardly conformed to revolutionary expectation.

    • [PDF] Download ☆ Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist | by Ñ Alexander Berkman John William Ward
      497 Alexander Berkman John William Ward
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist | by Ñ Alexander Berkman John William Ward
      Posted by:Alexander Berkman John William Ward
      Published :2018-02-21T05:12:21+00:00

    One thought on “Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist

    1. David

      The punishment is certainly cruel and unusual in Prison Memoirs. The guards arbitrarily beat, torture, and starve the inmates, including Alexander Berkman—one of the marquee names of early twentieth-century American anarchism. Okay, I take that back. There was only one marquee name of American anarchism, and that was Emma Goldman, but Berkman was (fortunately enough) fucking her so he basked in her white-hot afterglow. Berkman is sent to a Pennsylvania penitentiary for a ridiculously botched a [...]

    2. Stephen Durrant

      Alexander Berkman was born in 1870 in Lithuania, then part of the Russian Empire. He emigrated to the United States in 1888 and soon became active in the anarchist movement. After a failed attempt on the life of Henry Clay Frick on the occasion of the failure of the Homestead strike against the Carnegie Steal Company, Berkman was sentenced to twenty-two years in prison, of which he served fourteen years before his release in 1905. His prison memoirs are a powerful account of the horror of the Pe [...]

    3. Anti Cimex

      Some quick thoughts: A gorgeous bildungsroman, illustrating the evolution of radical thought in one individual while intertwined with the so called "immigrant experience". What is ultimately so splendid about the text is Berkman's realization of the inherent value found in all social actors, let them be the lumpenproleteriat of the prison or the authoritative gaze of the prison guard. Although many would argue Berkman's time in prison effectively instilled the dominant bourgeois ideology of soci [...]

    4. Ryan Mishap

      In prison for shooting an industrialist coal factory owner, Frick, Berkman regrets that the bastard wasn't killed, writes of daily life, some of his past, and on anarchism, naturally. I prefer autobiographies and memoirs to people's actual political texts, so I wasn't too disappointed here. I mean, we can all grasp the core beliefs of anarchy in about five minutes, but how people put them into practice is far more interesting.

    5. Alex

      Berkman gives a very real account of his time in prison and how it transformed from super-idealistic martyr to more troubled but realistic hardened anarchist. Parts of the book drag, as it feels the reader is in the prison cell with the author, but parts shine brightly, such as his very exciting and daring escape attempt. An amazing life.

    6. Mark

      In 1892, a Russian-born anarchist named Alexander Berkman walked into the office of Carnegie Steel executive Henry Clay Frick in Pittsburgh during the imfamous Homestead Steel lockout and tried to shoot Frick to death. His attempt failed, and Berkman eventually was sentenced to several years in prison in Pittsburgh. This piece of local history is fairly well known around here, but what is virtually unknown is the book Berkman wrote after his release from prison. It is astoundingly good, sounding [...]

    7. Stuart

      When he was 22, in July of 1892, Alexander Berkman attempted the assassination of Henry Clay Frick in retaliation for his attack on the Homestead strikers. He served 14 years of a 22 year sentence in Pennsylvania's Western Penitentiary outside of Pittsburgh. This book is a record of his life in the prison and the first months after his release.While Berkman's writing is often painfully melodramatic and baroque, the intensity of his experience carries through and makes this book an emotionally en [...]

    8. c(g) starling

      This is popular anarchist philosopher Alexander Berkman's (Emma Goldman's lifelong best friend) account of what happened preceding his assassination attempt on Louis Frick (a greedy capitalist, who sicked Pinkertons on an innocent group of picketing workers, killing many of them) and takes you behind prison walls with him to confront the evils of incarcerated life, the guards and warden, as well as those within himself and his actions (mainly his failing to kill to Frick).This book was colorful [...]

    9. Daisy

      The book covered many topics with the central issue being the prison system. Berkman did a great job describing the prisoners, the prison system and his experience within this system as an anarchist. One of the disturbing things was that even though the book was written in the early 1900's there are many similarities with the way prisons are run now. The book takes a little while to get into but after the first quarter it is very interesting.

    10. Tom

      Long, grim. Berkman's politics broaden and become less stilted through the experience of prison. Interesting reflections on sexuality.Probably a better use of time to read "Nestor Makhno - Anarchy's Cossak".

    11. Sugarpunksattack Mick

      Alexander Berkman’s ‘Prison Memoirs of an Anarchist’ is a harrowing account of survival in the American prison/justice system, but also the beautiful account of a committed revolutionary maintaining his humanity in the worst conditions possible. Berkman is sent to prison following his attempt to kill Henry Clay Frick for his role in crushing the homestead strike. The book begins with Berkman reading of the homestead strike and the killing of workers. He vows to gather funds, a gun, and to [...]

    12. Daphne

      This book took me an awful lot of time to read. I guess it was because of the way it was written. The last two sections though I read at once. The ending was very interesting to read, and it is a definately food-for-thought book

    13. J.W. Dionysius Nicolello

      I hadn't heard the name Berkman in about a decade, back when I was engrossed in the anarchist community, volunteering, writing, devouring whatever I could find by Goldman and Bakunin up to modern publications through AK Press. Then a friend introduced me to the Situationists, and at that point I abandoned all political contemplation altogether. No voting, no debating, no political inquiries stretching into dawn over swimming pools of Charles Shaw and Simpler Times out in the Bay Area. I came acr [...]

    14. Michael

      I was curious about this book for awhile. Mostly for how it would describe prison conditions and sexualty a hundred or so years ago. The morality of political violence, as explored in Camus' Les Justes, or The Just Assasins also interested me.Unforunately, the writing is so preposterously awful that I couldn't get through more than a quarter of this book. As for Berkman's description of his action, his utter lack of reflection let alone remorse, as well as his nonchalant ignoring of morality and [...]

    15. Dale

      Berkman describes the miserable abuse suffered in a Pennsylvania prison in the 1890s. He finds solace in the friendship of his fellow prisoners, and hatches an escape plot, but ultimately serves out his sentence. During the brief conclusion after his liberation, Berkman tours the country to speak to his fellow anarchists, but slips into a profound depression. His spirit is lifted by a friend who discusses Schopenhauer, and life as its own justification. Thanks to my friend Terence for recommendi [...]

    16. Drew Gordon

      The writing is mostly luke warm, unless he's talking about anarchism, then it gets blubbery. Read it for the fact that it is an interesting account of ole' prison life from an over-educated Russian radical.

    17. Sharon

      I wish Berkman had succeeded. Frick was a monster. In this book Berkman makes a clear the difference between violence for violence sake ( which he is firmly against) and ridding the people of a an enemy to their well being.

    18. Dan Au

      only in prison and alot of time, can an anarchist be broken & turned into a scared man of society. j/k, crisp writings of the inhumanities of man

    19. Christa

      One of the books which changed my life. Berkman discovers real freedom in a circumstance George Orwell could have described.

    20. Marcus K

      Incredibly depressing, but still inspiring example of what those who came before us had to go through (and, in may cases, still go through to this day).

    21. Ashley

      Could not finish this book - was expecting a memoir in sorts of events happening and conditions of prison during that period, but it was more about anarchism and self-righteousness than criminology.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *