Now Go Home: Wilderness, Belonging, and the Crosscut Saw

Now Go Home Wilderness Belonging and the Crosscut Saw How did a quintessential California girl end up earning her living in the Pacific Northwest with a crosscut saw In Now Go Home Spagna reflects on the journey that took her from a childhood in the sub

  • Title: Now Go Home: Wilderness, Belonging, and the Crosscut Saw
  • Author: Ana Maria Spagna
  • ISBN: 9780870710094
  • Page: 163
  • Format: Paperback
  • Now Go Home: Wilderness, Belonging, and the Crosscut Saw

    How did a quintessential California girl end up earning her living in the Pacific Northwest with a crosscut saw In Now Go Home, Spagna reflects on the journey that took her from a childhood in the suburbs of LA to a trail crew in Washington s North Cascades, where she falls in love with a place and, unexpectedly, with a woman.

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      Posted by:Ana Maria Spagna
      Published :2018-05-04T05:01:35+00:00

    One thought on “Now Go Home: Wilderness, Belonging, and the Crosscut Saw

    1. Liralen

      Concise, fluid look at working in the outdoors—probably what I wanted when I read Dirt Work. Lots of back-and-forth between different kinds of working outdoors, growing up in California (not a good thing socially, apparently, if you're going to work in the woods in the Pacific Northwest), and eventually finding somewhere to settle (and someone to settle down with) in quasi-wilderness.Other reviewers have described this in terms of essays, and although I didn't put that label on it as I read (i [...]

    2. David

      Picked this up while visiting the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State: Maybe in the gift shop of a National Park Lodge. Anyway, besides the charming challenge of the title, I was intrigued by the lesbian author. Seems to be a collection of essays previously published in a variety of outlets, and I like where the author is "coming from" as we used to say (does anyone still say that?). It was supposed to be a gift for a friend, but I decided to read it first, and now I foresee it being passed ar [...]

    3. Essemsee

      The writing is stylistically good. Concise, easy to read, and I love the subject matter having worked on trails with crosscuts and axes and having lived in the PNW. It's more the overall pathos. One of slowly succumbed to apathy. She loves the natural world enough to work and live in it but instead of a greater connection to the universe, her takeaway seems to be "well, I put in the time to 'protect' it, now get out and leave me be." Which is interesting considering her constant reprise of "I fe [...]

    4. Nancy Jainchill

      This is one of the better memoirs that I have read. It brings me to a place I have never been, with careful and effective description. And it captures emotions, perceptions, experiences that I think so many of us have, and which Spagna articates with clarify and impact. Statements such as "Goodbye is, I realize, as poignant as it is common" says so much. Spagna's honesty and self-discovery, are made particularly effective by the back and forth reflection from her life on the trail, to the contra [...]

    5. Leanne Davis

      This is a beautiful memoir that takes the reader into her life with stunning honesty and clear, concise writing and detail. I am lucky enough to live near many of the areas in Washington State she describes and it made me look at those areas with different eyes. She crafted an engaging, educational, entertaining and thoroughly worthwhile read in Now Go Home. I am normally a fiction reader but was recommended this book and am thoroughly glad I read it. It reads as fiction in it's captivating narr [...]

    6. Teresa

      "When I notice the flowers, what else am I missing? Should I define the trail by the flowers? Or by the red huckleberry meadows of fall, bears teaching their cubs to collect berries in one swipe of a paw? By the snowy corniced ridges of spring or by the gray stark granite of late summer? Complete this sentence: these mountains are. . . . That sentence would take too much time" (p. 35). "Sometimes if you are less strong or less skilled, the only thing you can do to prove yourself is to not compla [...]

    7. Mila

      Worth a read if you know any of the regions / occupations / kinds of people Spagna describes. I've lived and visited the places she loves, done trail work, and know the Forest Service trail (and other) crews intimately, so for me, this book rang true and made me smile as I read the minor, familiar details. I can't speak to its broader appeal, but it's a slim volume of essays, and it would be quite easy to give it a read in a day or two.

    8. Lors

      Very engaging glimpse into a life most of us will never experience. While both a glimpse into a personal view and a world apart from the one most live, the writer also connects her experience to larger life issues that affect us all. Being familiar with the setting was an extra draw for me.

    9. Judy

      Spagna's first book of essays in 2004. She worked for the trail crew for the National Park Service in the Northern Cascades, built a home near Stehekin, and shares her story and life in this nice collection. Refreshing, honest perspective of living in the "wilderness."

    10. Kathy Harris

      Enjoyed this book from Spagna a great deal, though I didn't love it as much as Potluck. But both are worth the time spent with the author.

    11. Susan

      Parts of this book made me laugh out loud, and parts had me nodding in recognition. The author spoke at a conference I help plan and is warm, funny, and genuine.

    12. Joe

      This is a cool book. Go read it. It's short essays about living and working in the Cascades in Washington. Oh yeah, my sister wrote it.

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