Drunken Angel: A Memoir

Drunken Angel A Memoir Alan Kaufman has been compared to Jack Kerouac Henry Miller Hubert Selby Jr even Ernest Hemmingway his life reads so much like a great movie that the world of cinema has just optioned his first memo

  • Title: Drunken Angel: A Memoir
  • Author: Alan Kaufman
  • ISBN: 9781936740321
  • Page: 437
  • Format: Paperback
  • Drunken Angel: A Memoir

    Alan Kaufman has been compared to Jack Kerouac, Henry Miller, Hubert Selby Jr even Ernest Hemmingway his life reads so much like a great movie that the world of cinema has just optioned his first memoir, Jew Boy, for a feature film Drunken Angel, his new autobiographical work, drops like a sledgehammer It is the most gripping, chilling and inspiring account ever writteAlan Kaufman has been compared to Jack Kerouac, Henry Miller, Hubert Selby Jr even Ernest Hemmingway his life reads so much like a great movie that the world of cinema has just optioned his first memoir, Jew Boy, for a feature film Drunken Angel, his new autobiographical work, drops like a sledgehammer It is the most gripping, chilling and inspiring account ever written of a life long battle with alcoholism and the struggle to write Graphic in its grit, an education in pain, Drunken Angel is being hailed as the Naked Lunch of memoirs The book chronicles Kaufman s headlong plunge into the piratical life of a literary drunk, and takes us shamelessly through noirish alleyways of SM sensuality, forbidden pleasures and pitfalls of adultery, the thrilling horrors of war, plus raging poetry nights, mental illness, homelessness, literary struggle and his strange, magnificent rise into a sobriety of personal triumph as crazily improbable as the famous and notorious figures he meets along the way Drunken Angel contains revealing portraits of such literary figures as Allen Ginsberg, Kathy Acker, Barney Rosset, Anthony Burgess, Elie Wiesel, Ron Kolm, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Jim Feast, Bernard Malamud, Hubert Selby Jr Bob Holman, Sapphire, not to speak of the gutter dreamers, Nuyorican Poets, Unbearables, Babarians, Slammers, Black foot Indians, commandos, criminals, junkies, renegade cocktail waitresses, hoboes, painters, and a host of others who each in some way, big or small, play their part in peopling the wildly exilerating drama of Kaufman s passionate and exotic life.Whether the addiction be booze, women, violence, writing or fame, Kaufman honors us with an explicit honesty that only a writer of enormous power and artistic greatness can attain, and his life, as Drunken Angel poignantly shows, is a profoundly meaningful quest for truth and spiritual values.

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    One thought on “Drunken Angel: A Memoir

    1. Julie

      An addiction and recovery memoir so exhaustive in detail that it's only yanked back from the potentially tiresome by Bronx-born Kaufman's relentlessly intelligent and honest voice. The son of a deeply troubled, abusive Holocaust survivor and a father with a serious gambling addiction, the author makes no excuses for his own terrible alcohol-soaked behavior that results: from hurling his body through blackout marriages, a dizzying array of sexual encounters that rival Richard Hell's (in Hell's ow [...]

    2. Kate

      I'm throwing caution to the wind and giving this 5 stars, even though while reading certain parts I thought I'd give it three or four. But the end was so good, and the story had such peak moments, and the writing is invigorating--so I do recommend it. The first half of the book is crushingly dark, but Kaufman's writing style elevates the material. That someone can make art out of such a mess of a life speaks to the power of literature.I was troubled by the way he depicted and treated many women [...]

    3. Ezekiel Tyrus

      I thoroughly enjoyed this book and will recommend it to others. It is more than just an addiction memoir. It's about somebody's becoming a human being really. The whole, "Courage to change the things I can, accept the things I can't," is presented in the latter part of the book as a lifestyle choice. I enjoyed the descriptions of Tel Aviv's bohemia. I'm aware all cities have their colonies of bohemia but was unaware Israel did or I simply never thought about it but thought that was cool and inte [...]

    4. Squirrel Circus

      This is one of those books about which I made a mental u-turn halfway through. About a 100 pages in and I HATED this guy - Kaufman. Really despised him, had no respect for him as a writer or a human being. I almost quit this book, but I gutted it out until "Part Two", and I GOT IT. Kaufman despised HIMSELF in the first half of the book, and, why not? He was a miserable drunk, user of women and friends, and a walking waste of potential. As he considers recovery, I was sold - sold on Kaufman's tal [...]

    5. Brenda

      The writing style was a little different from what I am used to, but it worked for this memoir. The author painted a raw, human, and mostly unflattering picture of the depths of his alcoholism, and the time, opportunities and relationships sacrificed for it. I had a hard time putting it down. At a point when it seemed impossible, one brief conversation with an empathetic stranger fueled a successful journey through AA. Reading about the struggle, his relationship with his live-saving sponsors, a [...]

    6. Saira

      Despite the number of dropped personal threads and increasingly scattered thoughts as the end of the book neared, I really enjoyed this personal reflection. His detailed journey into addiction, self-loathing and debilitating paranoia, though raunchy and never-ending, was a bitterly accurate portrayal of the inner workings of the alcoholic mind. I have never read his other books, but I am curious. Ironically, the part of his life where his writing began to take off was where I felt the story beca [...]

    7. Deanna Comer

      I found this book to be a real page turner. Although Part One leads anyone in their right mind to be filled with disgust and dislike for the author/main character, I was never fully able to recover from that feeling. It seems as though Alan blamed a lot of bad parenting on his ex wife but he was completely absent for the entirety of his daughters upbringing and cannot possibly fathom what it really is to be a parent. I think Alan grasped this to an extent but nonetheless is naïve. Truly a story [...]

    8. Aaron Mcilhenny

      Overall, I thought this was a great book. It takes a while to get into because he glosses over everything he (presumably) covers in Jew Boy, and I feel like the fifty or so pages about him getting published could have been shortened, even though I enjoyed them. He also sometimes did this thing where his sentences didn't have subjects, which I did not like at all. But other than that I found Kaufman's memoir to be a touching, vivid, and real account of alcoholism and PTSD, one that belongs on the [...]

    9. Susan

      This book is enormously compelling, but I wish a couple of things were included: information on the further impact of his newspaper writing, and more on his emotional state in his evolving attitudes toward women.Otherwise, if you are an artist and a late bloomer - whether due to having to earn a living or for some other reason - this book can be incredibly inspirational.

    10. Heather

      Most of this book I did not enjoy at all, however the middle was pretty interesting. I like the actual parts about his recovery, not the babble in the first half of the book. It gets lost near the end too. Very hard to focus on. I much enjoyed the part about the fish.

    11. Adam

      A good fast readI'd read a preview of this one a few years ago, but wasn't quite ready for it then. Great first 100 pages, far more interesting than a typical drunkalog.

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